• Massage and Anxiety

    Posted on October 20, 2014 by Cat Stolz in Uncategorized.

    National Mental Illness Awareness Week has just passed for the year, and we’re coming up on National Health Education Week. No better time for me to tell you all about how massage can help relieve anxiety!

    Anxiety Disorders affect about 40 million American adults in a given year. Anxiety is described as a feeling of dread, fear, or apprehension often with no clear justification. Most people experience symptoms of anxiety at one time or another, but for those with a disorder, normal daily life is often interrupted and limited.

    A few common anxiety disorders are panic disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), social phobia (Social Anxiety), and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. While there are varying symptoms with each, many physiological responses overlap with the different disorders. Many people are able to function with symptoms while others are unable cope with them.

    Some disorders manifest with physical symptoms like sleeping problems, shortness of breath, heart palpitations, nausea, sweating or dry mouth. Others are purely emotional, denoted by excessive, unrealistic worry, feelings of panic, fear, and uneasiness. Usually, there’s a combination of physical and emotional symptoms.

    Massage may help anxiety

    The American Massage Therapy Association has adopted a position statement based on research findings asserting that “massage therapy can assist in reducing the symptoms of anxiety.” It goes on to say that massage may reduce symptoms of anxiety in women in labor, psychiatric patients, cancer patients, patients with Generalized Anxiety Disorder, children with illnesses, and many more types of clients.

    The effects of massage therapy include reduced blood pressure, slowed/regulated breathing, and a slower pulse rate. If increased heart rate and rapid breathing are symptoms of anxiety could massage therapy may have a positive effect. Simply taking time to relax and removing yourself from the busy-ness of daily life can be helpful in handling some kinds of anxiety.

    Those with more complicated anxiety issues may benefit from regular massage in conjunction with talk therapy, medication, and lifestyle changes.

    I personally enjoy helping my clients with anxiety achieve deep relaxation during their massages with a cozy environment, comfortable pressure, and long, slow strokes. There are also some anxiety-reducing breathing exercises I can recommend from my training in Kundalini yoga — many clients find it empowering to have something they can do at home or work to quell their feelings of anxiety.

    Ask questions

    If you are unsure about trying massage to help your anxiety, ask questions. Call or email me and we can talk about your experience with massage and how it may help you. Check in with your health care provider and your therapist or counselor. (Be sure to let me know if they would like more information about massage and anxiety, I can provide that!)

    When you’re ready, we’ll schedule an appointment and you can see firsthand how massage may help you.

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